Five-year old boy sent UAB his $1 allowance to try and help save UAB football

When I was young I saved my allowance to buy baseball cards and Nintendo games. One five-year old in Ohio decided to spend his hard-earned allowance to try to save UAB football.

Bennett Williams, from Dublin, Ohio, is an Ohio State fan but adopted UAB as his second favorite team after thinking the logo for the Blazers was pretty cool. When word of UAB shutting down its football program made its way to the young boy, a will to do all he can to save the program led him to write a letter to the school, accompanied by his allowance money (one dollar). Every little bit helps, right?

The letter, as transcribed by Al.com, reads as follows;

“DEAR UAB. I LOVE OHIO STATE, BUT I THINK YOU SHOULD HAVE FOOTBALL, TOO. HERE IS ONE DOLLAR TO HELP! – BENNETT”

The letter did not go unread. UAB athletics department, Reid Adair, replied with thanks to Bennett for his letter and followed up by sending a nice little care package of UAB merchandise.

Bennett’s allowance may not have been enough to save the UAB football program, but it should do plenty to restore your faith in humanity.

5-star WR Christian Kirk commits to Texas A&M, believes he can be a ‘legend’

Texas A&M is still trying to prove it runs this state. And so far, the Aggies are doing just that on the recruiting trail.

The nation’s No. 5 ranked class got stronger on Wednesday afternoon as Texas A&M picked up a commitment from consensus five-star wide receiver Christian Kirk. The Scottsdale (AZ) product announced his decision during a ceremony at his school.

“I’m a real independent guy and I wanted to start something on my own and create my own journey,” he said when asked about leaving the state. “I really believe I can be a legend somewhere else. I trust Coach (Kevin) Sumlin and what he talked to me about.

“It’s definitely the hardest thing I’ve ever had to deal with, but it’s a blessing.”

Kirk also stated that his relationship with Texas A&M quarterback Kyle Allen played a major role in his commitment. Allen, who was also a five-star prospect out of Arizona, took over for Kenny Hill as the starter midway through the season.

“Me and Kyle are really close,” Kirk said. “I told him the news last night and he was pumped. We’re two AZ kids ready to take over the SEC. With Malcolm Kennedy graduating, that’s a spot they hope for me to fill. I’m excited to get in there and start working. Hopefully we’re going to put a class together to make a run at a national championship soon.”

Rivals.com ranks Kirk as the No. 3 wide receiver in the 2015 class and No. 29 overall prospect in the nation. He picked the Aggies over fellow finalists Arizona State, Auburn, UCLA and USC.

Kirk is a major get for Texas A&M, especially considering the Aggies lost five-star Cedar Hill wide receiver DaMarkus Lodge in September. Texas A&M now has three wide receivers in its 2015 class. Kirk joins Blinn C.C.’s Damion Ratley and Cy Ridge’s Kemah Siverand.

EJ Holland is the Associate Editor at Dave Campbell’s Texas Football. You can follow him on Twitter @EJSports4. 

‘People Are Awesome 2014′, A Supercut of Amazing Stunts Performed by Humans in 2014

People Are Awesome 2014” is a supercut by People Are Awesome showcasing some of the most amazing stunts performed by humans in 2014. Included in the video are incredible examples of parkour, extreme sports, and feats of skill that have to be seen to be believed. The full list of videos used is included in the video’s YouTube description.

RB DeMarco Murray has hand surgery

IRVING, Texas — Dallas Cowboys running back DeMarco Murray had surgery Monday to repair a broken bone in his left hand, coach Jason Garrett said.

Murray, however, has not been ruled out for this week’s game against the Indianapolis Colts.

“The biggest question we have to ask ourselves is, is he functional to do his job?” Garrett said. “Can he hold the football? Can he carry it under duress? Can he block? Can he do the things necessary to play the position?

“He’s as strong-willed and as determined an individual as I’ve ever been around, and if anybody has a chance to come back, he does. So let’s take first things first and see how the surgery goes, and we’ll make our best decisions from there.”

Murray suffered a broken fourth metacarpal bone, a source told ESPN.com. The injury occurred late in the fourth quarter of the Cowboys’ 38-27 win against the Philadelphia Eagles.

After the game, Murray said he was “good,” but he did not elaborate about his hand. He had X-rays taken after the game and was examined further Monday.

The fourth metacarpal is the long bone in the hand that runs from the base of the fourth finger to the wrist.

If Murray can’t play against the Colts, the Cowboys would turn to Joseph Randle and Lance Dunbar as their top tailbacks. Ryan Williams has spent the year on the practice squad.

“We have a lot of confidence in those guys,” Garrett said. “Obviously we like to give them opportunities in games to spell DeMarco and just to give those guys a shot. I thought last night was a good example of how those guys consistently take advantage of those opportunities. Joseph got a couple of carries and was productive with his. I felt Lance did a really nice job in that game, at the end of the game handling the football and just doing some good things and making some good runs. They weren’t splashy runs but they were real positive runs in critical moments of that ballgame.”

Should Murray miss the game, it would be a serious blow to an offense that has relied heavily on the NFL’s leading rusher. Murray has established career highs in carries (351) and yards (1,687). He needs 87 yards in the final two games to eclipse Emmitt Smith’s single-season team record of 1,773 yards set in 1995. He has an outside shot at 2,000 yards, as well, but those chances took a hit Sunday when he was held to 81 yards on 31 carries.

Murray has 11 100-yard games this season and has scored a career-high 11 touchdowns. Randle has 237 yards on 34 carries and has two touchdowns. Dunbar has 91 yards on 26 carries.

Others have dealt with the same or similar injuries as Murray’s. Smith missed one game in 1999 after undergoing the surgery following a 13-carry, 140-yard and two-touchdown game against the Minnesota Vikings. He had two straight 100-yard games after his return. In 2006, Terrell Owens suffered a similar injury while with the Cowboys. He had a plate and screws implanted into his hand and did not miss a game, thanks to the Cowboys’ bye week. He wore a glove with extra padding on the top of his hand for added protection. In 2011, Denver Broncos running back Willis McGahee missed one game with the injury.

Because Murray carries the ball predominantly in his right hand, it might not be much of an issue, but he has lost five fumbles on the season. He missed 11 games in his first three seasons with ankle, foot and knee injuries.

TCU’s Patterson named Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year by football writers

TCU head coach Gary Patterson has been named the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year for the second time in his career. Patterson was named this year’s coach of the year by the Football Writers Association of America and is the eighth coach to win the award multiple times.

“I’d like to thank the Football Writers Association of America,” Patterson said in astatement released by the FWAA Monday afternoon. “I’m very honored and humbled to be a part of such a great award and the man it represents.”

The award is named after former Grambling head coach Eddie Robinson, the all-time winningest coach in Division 1 history with 408 wins*. Robinson coached Grambling to 17 SWAC titles and nine Black College Football Championships during his coaching career.

Patterson guided TCU to a record of 11-1 and a share of the Big 12 championship in the third year as a Big 12 member for the Horned Frogs. TCU slipped out of the College Football Playoff field, but the success of the season in Fort Worth should not be overlooked. Patterson is known more for his defensive mindset, but this year he and his staff opened things up offensively and used that to their advantage. The ability and will to adapt is something that separates great coaches from the good coaches.

Other coaches to win the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year award at twice are Nick Saban, Lou Holtz, Darrell Royal, John McKay and Johnny Majors. The only three-time winners of the award were Woody Hayes and Joe Paterno. Alabama’s Saban was one of the finalists for the award as well. Ohio State’s Urban Meyer, Oregon’s Mark Helfrich and Florida State’s Jimbo Fisher, Baylor’s Art Briles, Boise State’s Bryan Harsin, and Justin Fuente of Memphis were also finalists for the award this season.

Patterson was named the Home Depot Coach of the Year during last week’s college football awards show. He has also been named the Big 12 coach of the year by the Associated Press and the Big 12.

* Joe Paterno broke the record with 409 wins but was stripped of the record as a result of NCAA sanctions against the Penn State program in 2012.

Philadelphia fans throw beer bottles and eggs at Cowboys buses

From DallasNews.com

Philadelphia Eagles fans welcomed the Dallas Cowboys to Philly by throwing eggs and beer bottles at the team buses.

Our writer Jon Machota reports that most of the effort hit only the media bus. Here is the Twitter reaction to the events:

It started out innocent enough.

 

Then the pelting came.  

Louisiana Tech’s Famed Quarterbacks Achieving Stardom in Different Venues

Bradshaw and Robertson…

No, it’s not a law firm in Shreveport, La., but two of Louisiana Tech’s most famous quarterbacks (for different reasons) that grace the national airways weekly and have brought fame and recognition to the Tech program.

As the 2014 Bulldogs prepare for their first Zaxby’s Heart of Dallas Bowl appearance on Dec. 26 at historic Cotton Bowl Stadium, both alumni are watching with anticipation.

The names of Terry Bradshaw and Phil Robertson are etched throughout Bulldogs’ gridiron history as they actually competed for the 1967 starting quarterback’s post for the then-NCAA College Division powerhouse.

And little did they know that their later careers would take them to NFL Super Bowl and College and Pro Football Hall of Fame accolades (Bradshaw) and successful business and entertainment ventures in Duck Commander (now the sponsor of the Duck Commander Independence Bowl in Shreveport) and the “Duck Dynasty” national television series (Robertson).

Bradshaw starred for the 1967-1969 Bulldogs, led them to wins over such teams as Southeastern Conference contender Mississippi State, ranked tops nationally in NCAA passing a junior in ’68 with 2,890 passing yards, paced the Dogs to a 9-2 record, and led them to a 33-13 triumph over Akron in the Rice Bowl.  The Emmy Award winner added 2,314 passing yards as a senior for the 8-2 Tech squad and became the No. 1 player selected in the 1970 NFL draft.

The popular Fox Sports commentator also ended his Pro Football Hall of Fame career with 168 games played, 2,025-of-3,901 passing attempts for 51.9 percent, 27,989 aerial yards, and 212 TD passes over a 14-season career from 1970-83 – all with the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Robertson, meanwhile, started at quarterback for the Bulldogs in 1966 and 1967 and elected not to play in 1968 because it interfered with his incessant love of hunting, which later led to the successful duck call manufacturing business and eventual television career with “Duck Dynasty.

The four-sport star in high school finished his two-season career at Tech with 179-of-411 passing and 2,237 yards with 12 TD tosses but a school-record 34 interceptions.  That probably also led to his football career stoppage in 1968 before Robertson received a BA in physical education from Tech.

And he told an interviewer many years later about his relationship with Bradshaw: “Terry went for the bucks, and I chased the ducks.”

The two true characters on the televised airwaves approach the holidays and bowl season, it is safe to assume they will be there in person or tuned in for their alma mater’s contest with Illinois in the Zaxby’s Heart of Dallas Bowl.


Bo Carter is a media professional who has worked in the DFW area for 28 years in Southwest and Big 12 Conference media relations as well as being a correspondent for the National Football Foundation, Sports Page DFW and other area sports groups.

Young happy to be back winning and back home

Winning and Texas. Donovonn Young knows a thing or two about both.

Fortunately for the Illinois senior running back, his Illini did enough of the former to allow him to return to the latter.

Thanks to a late-season flurry, Young, who starred as a prep for storied Katy High School in greater Houston, has a chance to close his college career back in the Lone Star State on Dec. 26 when the Illini play in the Zaxby’s Heart of Dallas Bowl. He expects 25 to 30 friends and family members to be on hand to watch him in person.

“I feel like it’s a fairy tale ending the way these last few weeks have gone,” Young said.

When Illinois owned a 3-4 overall record midway through the season with five Big Ten Conference games remaining, things did not look particularly good for the squad’s postseason chances. However, following a bye week, the Illini managed to knock off top-25 Minnesota in its next outing. Then, sitting 4-6 with two weeks remaining, Illinois pulled off back-to-back victories to earn its first bowl appearance since 2011.

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