Texas Tech DC Matt Wallerstedt resigns

Texas Tech defensive coordinator Matt Wallerstedt abruptly resigned Thursday after sources told ESPN.com that the coach was suspected of being under the influence of an unknown substance while on campus.

The source, who told ESPN.com earlier on Thursday that Wallerstedt had been fired, said the coach was sent home from the football facility on Monday.

“I have submitted my resignation to Coach Kingsbury effective immediately because I want the best for the Red Raider program, and this will allow them to go in a different direction on defense,” Wallerstedt said in a statement. “I love our players and this school and have only their best interest in my heart and mind. I wish Coach Kingsbury every success this season.”

The Red Raiders surrendered 438 rushing yards in a 49-28 loss to Arkansas last weekend, but the team’s on-the-field performance was not related to Wallerstedt’s dismissal, sources said.

Wallerstedt joined the Texas Tech staff last season, coming over from Texas A&M along with head coach Kliff Kingsbury.

“We appreciate all Coach Wallerstedt has done at Texas Tech and we wish him the best,” Kingsbury said in a statement.

Wallerstedt will be replaced by co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach Mike Smith, who played for the Red Raiders and graduated from Texas Tech in 2004. Matt Brock has been elevated from defensive quality control coach and will now coach the linebackers.

Smith will be Texas Tech’s seventh defensive coordinator since 2007.

The Red Raiders are off this weekend before traveling to play Oklahoma State on Sept. 25.

Report: Texas A&M will pay $300,000 to ship in a new field from North Carolina

For a university that takes such pride in their grass (seriously, go there some time), the playing conditions – or lack thereof – at Kyle Field last Saturday night had to be especially disheartening for Texas A&M. Heavy rain Friday night and Saturday morning combined with Kyle Field’s natural grass combined to create a playing surface that was hazardous at best and dangerous at worst.

“The field was kind of bad, but both teams had to play on it,” Texas A&M wide receiver Ricky Seals-Jones told the Houston Chronicle after the game.

Rice head coach David Bailiff said “had some concerns” about even bringing his team out of the locker room to play the second half. (He did, and Rice lost 38-10). “I thought the grounds crew did about as good a job as anybody could do,” Bailiff said. “They kept the surface safe. Every time they saw a divot, they ran out there and fixed it.”

These post-game tweets showed his fears were not without reason.

 

According to a report from the Bryan-College Station Eagle, Texas A&M has a plan in place to fix the field, and will spare no expense to do it. Texas A&M officials plan to pay North Carolina-based company Carolina Green to ship an entirely new field to College Station.

The field will be moved in pieces inside 21 refrigerated trucks and begin installation the week of Sept. 29. Texas A&M System vice chancellor of marketing and communications Steve Moore says the process should take about four days.

“After the game, the chancellor asked the staff and the Kyle Field redevelopment committee to look at options,” Moore told the paper. “He wanted to know how to provide the best competitive playing surface we could going to forward and that’s what led to this process and the decisions that have been made.”

Carolina Green offers a thicker, more solid base that should allow the sod to take root in time for the Aggies’ next home game. And if there’s one silver lining to this story, it’s that the replacement comes at a good time: the Aggies are on the road the next three weeks, visiting SMU on Saturday, facing Arkansas at AT&T Stadium on Sept. 27, and visiting Mississippi State on Oct. 4. The sixth-ranked Aggies return to Kyle Field and their new surface on Oct. 11 to face No. 10 Ole Miss.

The new field comes at a cost of $300,000, but that’s chump change when you’re paying nearly half a billion dollars to renovate your football stadium.

Sooners to debut alternate unis vs. WVU

Because, of course, there’s something inherently wrong with their classic, iconic, traditional football duds.

Regardless, Oklahoma revealed Wednesday that they will be wearing alternate uniforms for the nationally-televised game against West Virginia Saturday night. This version is actually one of the different alternate combinations announced back in July but have yet to be worn.

Head coach Bob Stoops sounded positively thrilled over the debut of the uniforms.

We just thought we might as well use them. Since you got them, you eventually got to use them,” Stoops said.

As we wrote a couple of months ago, the Sooners will have a pair of alternate uniforms to choose from moving forward.

One adopts a white alternate helmet, while one features a wood grain pattern in the numbering, lettering and the helmet itself. The wood grain is supposed to be reminiscent of, a press release stated, “the weathered texture of the Sooner Schooner, a Conestoga reminiscent of the pioneer mode of travel employed by the hearty souls who settled Oklahoma Territory around the time of the 1889 Land Run.”

The newer uniforms also feature the phrase “47 straight,” a tribute to Oklahoma’s NCAA record winning streak running from 1953 through 1957.

The uniforms that will be worn in the Big 12 opener against the Mountaineers in Morgantown will have the wood-grain theme.

 

Ron Washington claims he resigned because he cheated on his wife

On September 5, Ron Washington abruptly resigned from the Texas Rangers. He gave no explanation apart from citing “an off-the-field personal matter.” He just spoke to the press in Dallas and explained why he resigned. Sort of.

Washington said “I was not true to my wife, after 42 years.” He said nothing more as far as explanation. He said “I made a mistake, and I’m embarrassed. More than I’ve ever been in my life.” He added that “when you put yourself in situations, you own it,” and said he apologized to his wife and wanted to apologize “to those I disappointed,” including his players, his coaches, Major League Baseball and the Texas Rangers.

He added, “All I ask is for your forgiveness and your understanding.” He further asked that his privacy be respected. He said the matter was “certainly personal,” and that “we’re trying to put it behind us.” He said “Today I’m at a very low time in my life.” Washington took no questions.

To put it plainly: Ron Washington is not the first and will not be the last person in baseball to cheat on his wife. None, that I am aware of, resigned for it. One has to assume that there is more to this story.