‘College GameDay’ Is Back And We Can Confirm That Lee Corso Is Still Nuts

ESPN’s pre-game and post-game and halftime shows usually suffer from a lack of, shall we say, interesting things happening. Personalities are dialed back and everyone wears the same suit and says the same things and it’s generally a boring affair.

Not “College GameDay.” That show is awesome, and we’re so glad it’s back, if only so we can watch Lee Corso go nuts. This morning, he drank some beer with Stone Cold Steve Austin:

Drinking beer and shooting guns and watching football — is there anything in this world more American than Lee Corso? If so, it’s probably this guy:

The Kings Have Traded Jason Terry To The Rockets

hich would be a really big deal, if this were 2011. But since it isn’t, Sacramento in return will get Alonzo Gee and his non-guaranteed contract, some other, not-named non-guaranteed contract players, and draft picks — two second-rounders, including one via the Knicks. The intent seems to be for the Kings to clear cap space. Terry had been making $5.6 million.

 

For those keeping score, the teams are Houston, Sacramento, Brooklyn and Dallas.

Week one around college football shows why preseason rankings stink

I don’t know about you, but Oklahoma State sure looked like a top 25 team to me as I watched the Cowboys give defending national champion and consensus preseason umber one Florida State all they could handle. The Pokes forced Jameis Winston to look vulnerable at times (although the best player in college football overcame that by showing just why he won the Heisman Trophy in 2013 when needed) with a pair of interceptions. Oklahoma State held Florida State to just four third down conversions on 14 attempts and nearly countered every punch thrown by Florida State in the second half, pushing the Seminoles to the final second. Oklahoma State lost the game, of course, and there is not much of a chance any voter will include them in a top 25 poll this week.

But would it be fair to say Oklahoma State’s loss to Florida State was more respectable than No. 25 Washington’s 17-16 win at Hawaii? Maybe, depending on whom you ask.

The controversy and debate over preseason rankings are nothing new. The reason they exist is purely for debate, conversation and in this day and age, page views. We’re all guilty of it, even those of us who question why preseason rankings exist. We all check them out, even if we say we do not care about them. This week in college football will add some fuel to that discussion, but nothing will change.

Is No. 21 Texas A&M and new Heisman contender Kenny Hill really 24 points better than No. 9 South Carolina? What do we make of No. 7 UCLA beating Virginia by eight points when the offense only scored seven points (that defense is good, but they will not put up 21 points each week)? How much should we boost No. 12 Georgia or drop No. 16 Clemson after Todd Gurley muscled the Bulldogs’ 24-point victory? Ohio State was ranked fifth in the preseason polls, before quarterback Braxton Millerwas lost for the year. They pulled away from Navy in Baltimore, but could possibly fall in the rankings without doing anything wrong.

Aside from the mismatches with FCS competition, the only game that may have been the best representation of the preseason rankings was No. 13 LSU coming from behind to defeat No. 14 Wisconsin, and the Badgers sure did not look like a top 15 team while letting a 24-7 second-half lead evaporate. Injuries on defensive line were one thing, but giving Melvin Gordon the football just three times for one yard, turning over the football twice and going three-and-out three times is not what a top 15 team does, even against a team as talented as LSU.

The good news is things should be different this season. With no BCS computer formulas adding various rankings into the equation and a selection committee chosen to determine the tp four teams at the end of the season, where teams fall in the preseason rankings may not have as much of an impact. It will be hard for the selection committee to stray from the long, storied tradition of poll and ranking philosophy, but they will not be influenced as much by preseason rankings as they are results on the field. But then again, isn’t the weight of the results on the field influenced by the preseason rankings? Oh boy.

The new Associated Press top 25 will be released on Tuesday this week, to account for games being played Sunday (No. 10 Baylor vs SMU, Tennessee vs. Utah State) and Monday night (Louisville vs. Miami).

Sweetwater puts on a first-half show in rout of Lubbock High

Kaegan Jeffrey

SWEETWATER, Texas - Slingin’ Sammy Baugh would have been proud of his alma mater in his namesake classic at the Mustang Bowl on Friday night.

The Mustangs galloped out of the gates to the tune of 34 points in the opening quarter on their way to a 66-35 rout of Lubbock High in the marquee game of the Sammy Baugh Classic.

“Our kids were ready to get out and execute,” Sweetwater coach Shane Mobley said. “We are young and they are hungry. A few of them were throwing up in the locker room before the game because they were nervous.”

Senior quarterback Kaegan Jeffrey threw for 265 yards and five touchdowns as the Mustangs rolled to the easy win in their highest scoring game in more than 25 years.

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Michael Sam released by Rams; should Cowboys sign him?

Michael Sam, the first openly gay player to be drafted in the NFL, was cut on Saturday by the St. Louis Rams.

The 7th-round draft pick has been outspoken and confident as his progress was watched as closely as any rookie in the league. He has been cheered by athletes and celebrities. In the end, the defensive end couldn’t make a team stocked with pass-rushers.

Sam, a defensive end who can rush the passer, made a strong case for a roster spot in the preseason. He had 11 tackles and three sacks, including a team-leading six tackles in the Rams’ 14-13 loss to the Miami Dolphins on Thursday night.

“There will be no challenge, no challenges whatsoever,” for whatever team picks up Sam, Rams coach Jeff Fisher said at a news conference.

“There’s no challenge with respect to Mike Sam,” Fisher said. “He’s not about drawing attention to himself. He kept his head down and worked and you can’t ask anything more out of any player for that matter.”

Sam can be picked up by another team or make the Rams’ practice squad.

The Dallas Cowboys could look at Sam as a candidate to boost their pass rush.

Sam wasn’t in the Cowboys’ draft plans. They didn’t pursue him in the draft and didn’t have him ranked high on their draft board. Also, the Cowboys don’t view Sam as a good scheme fit for them. The Cowboys want speedy defensive ends. Also, Sam is more of a left defensive end, and the Cowboys have more of a need at right defensive end with rookie DeMarcus Lawrence expected to miss the first half of the season and Anthony Spencer not expected to play the first few weeks.

Still, a Cowboys defense that finished last in the NFL a year ago did nothing in the preseason that should inspire confidence.

The Cowboys allowed 116 points in their four preseason losses after allowing 93 points in five preseason games a year ago. The 116 points tied for the second-most allowed through four preseason games in club history.

And their prime pass rusher was hurt. Defensive tackle Henry Melton – the Cowboys’ biggest free agent addition of the offseason – didn’t play a snap in any preseason game as he battled a strained groin and continued to recover from surgery to repair a torn left anterior cruciate ligament.

My take? Jerry should draft this guy. The defense needs him. This guy is a workaholic.

Suspended LB claims Oklahoma made him a ‘scapegoat’

Oklahoma linebacker Frank Shannon isn’t pulling any punches after being suspended by the university for a year due to an accusation of sexual assault.

Shannon’s attorney, Aletia Timmons, spoke with the media Friday. Timmons painted a completely different picture than the one that was originally given regarding Shannon’s status.

The most pertinent statement made to the media was Shannon’s claim of innocence.

 

Shannon and his representation took the linebacker’s claims a step further. The university reportedly conducted an internal investigation before it handed down it’s punishment. In doing so, Shannon claims the school “failed” him and made him into a “scapegoat.” Shannon even submitted to a polygraph test to clear his name.  


Shannon never considered the possibility of transferring from the University of Oklahoma.

“I’m not running,” Shannon told Timmons during their initial meeting, according to The Oklahoman. “I’m not going to be branded as a rapist.”

Instead, Shannon plans to publicly protest the university’s decision to have him suspended.

Shannon’s adamant views make this a compelling case. The university and its football team have to err on the side of caution. Whereas, Shannon obviously feels like his name is being dragged through the mud.

The only thing that bring some finality to this case is the results of the ongoing investigation by the police department. The university can’t budge on its current stance after stating it “takes very seriously its obligation in cases like this.” And Shannon shouldn’t back down if he’s innocent.

Shannon, who was Oklahoma’s leading tackler a year ago, still has the “ability to appeal any decision reached by the University to a district court.” Until then, he’ll have to wait on the sidelines until some type of decision is made.

Access denied: FIU doesn’t provide credential for only beat writer

 Exposure is everything in today’s college football landscape. Unfortunately for the players at Florida International University, the school’s decision makers don’t feel the same way.

FIU and the Miami Herald are caught in a little tiff.

The Herald is the only news agency in the area which employs a beat writer to cover FIU athletics. In the infinite wisdom of those making decisions at FIU, they denied access to the Herald’s beat writer, David J. Neal, for the Panthers’ season-opener against Bethune-Cookman.

“It’s unprecedented for any local team to refuse to credential our beat reporter without reason,” Miami Herald Executive Editor Aminda Marqués Gonzalez said. “The team does not get to choose who covers the program.”

The newspaper decided not cover the game at all after FIU denied the credential.

“We’re very disappointed the Herald has decided on this course,” Sandra Gonzalez-Levy, FIU’s senior vice president for external relations, said. “Credentials were given to other reporters. We regret that this is the Herald’s choice.”

FIU never provided a reason why Neal’s credential was denied.

It’s simply another misstep for a football program has been in a downward spiral since it fired Mario Cristobal. During Cristobal’s tenure the coach led the Panthers to two bowl games before he was unceremoniously dismissed. The team then struggled to find any coaching candidates that were interested in the vacant position. The team eventually hired Ron Turner, who finished with an 1-11 record during his first season.

Furthermore, the people hurt by this decision are the players. They don’t get the exposure they deserve for the work they’ve done. And the community doesn’t have the opportunity to read about a program the newspaper is willing to support.

 

This sort of reminds me of when I tried to get media credentials at TCU. I guess some schools just think they are “too good” to report on. SMH.